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Strater Hotel sold The Strater Hotel, owned for decades by Rod Barker and his family, sold the hotel this week to Ross Garrett, who lives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. 1600 1085 Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, talks about the history of the hotel. Photo by Jerry McBride false 1225 656 Durango Herald file false 1542 1028 The Diamond Belle Saloon is often busy with patrons eating, drinking and listening to ragtime piano. Photo by The Durango Herald false 2274 1591 Durango Herald file false 1940 1487 The Colorado Mounted Rangers and others march past the Strater Hotel during the 21st annual Durango Cowboy Poetry Gathering parade on Oct. 3, 2009, in downtown Durango. Photo by The Durango Herald false 1542 1034 Durango Herald file false 1150 1648 A young Rod Barker, owner of the Strater Hotel, stands inside his historic business in this undated photograph. Durango Herald file false 1318 2322 DAVID BERGELAND/Durango Herald - 08/20/12 - Riders head south toward the Strater Hotel on Main Avenue during the USA Pro Cycling Challenge in Durango. false
The Strater Hotel, owned for decades by Rod Barker and his family, sold the hotel this week to Ross Garrett, who lives in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
Rail car restoration The Galloping Goose Historical Society in Dolores works on restoring five rail cars that ran on area rialroad tracks. 1600 1088 Galloping Goose Historical Society members from left, Chris Pranskatis, Ben Deason, Joe Becker and Bill Wolf work on Friday taking a door off of a stock railcar that was built in 1903 to transport livestock. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1577 1010 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1274 943 Galloping Goose Historical Society member, Chris Pranskatis, works on taking off a door on Friday of a stock railcar in Dolores that was built in 1903 to transport livestock. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1069 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 725 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1486 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 532 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 Galloping Goose Historical Society members from left, Ben Deason, Bill Wolf Chris Pranskatis and Joe Becker work on Friday taking a door off of a stock railcar that was built in 1903 to transport livestock. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1406 A railcar that dumps its load from the bottom is a car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1545 980 A railcar that dumps its load from the bottom is a car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1300 At some point someone carved the Tommy Boy Mine into a beam in a box car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1126 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1278 At some point someone wrote their name in a box car that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 A railcar that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on the local narrow-gauge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1064 Bill Wolf, with the Galloping Goose Historical Society, describes how wooden panels could slide down for air circulation on one of the box cars that the society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on local narrow-gauge tracks. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1283 One of two box cars that the Galloping Goose Historical Society is fixing up in Dolores. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on local narrow-gauge tracks. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
The Galloping Goose Historical Society in Dolores works on restoring five rail cars that ran on area rialroad tracks.
Demolition derby Saturday night’s demolition derby drew about 1,600 fans to Fairgrounds Speedway. 1663 1198 Darrel Cordary’s car bursts into flames during a demolition derby that took place at Fairgrounds Speedway in Cortez on April 17. false 3122 2039 Drivers collide during an exciting night of action at the demolition derby on Saturday night. false 2000 1333 Steam and smoke rise out of the engine of a station wagon shortly after a big collision on the Fairgrounds Speedway track. false 2000 1118 Cars pile together near the center of the arena as excited fans look on during the demolition derby on April 17. false 2000 1333 A driver gazes out the window of his vehicle while attempting to get his engine running on Saturday night. false 2000 1273 A forklift hauls a disabled car away from the arena as the sun sets at Fairgrounds Speedway on Saturday night. false 2000 1333 James Miner backs his car during the center of the arena while competing in the demolition derby on April 17. Miner and his 1980’s Lincoln Town Car took first place in the “Full Size Car” classification. false 2000 1183 Steam rises into the air as drivers navigate along a muddy track at Saturday night’s demolition derby. false 2000 1372 A vehicle careens towards the arena barrier after getting hit head-on. false 2000 1298 Steam rises into the air as drivers jockey for position. false 1333 889 An overhead light at Fairgrounds Speedway casts an eerie glow over disabled cars during Saturday night’s demolition derby. false
Saturday night’s demolition derby drew about 1,600 fans to Fairgrounds Speedway.
K-9 search and rescue Jon Bonnette works with his dogs, training them for search and rescue and human remains detection. 1600 1156 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, is all business in the field while trying to find three people who hid on a 40-acre plot Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1098 Jon Bonnette gets the attention of his dogs, Isidore, left, trained in air-scent search and rescue, and Raaz, trained in human remains detection, on Tuesday before a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1353 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, is all business in the field while trying to find three people who hid on a 40-acre plot Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1449 Not only has Jon Bonnette trained Isidore for search and rescue, but she demonstrates Tuesday some fun tricks he has taught her before a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1052 Jon Bonnette works with his dogs, Isidore, left, trained in air-scent search and rescue, and Raaz, trained in human remains detection, on Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1258 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, returns to her owner after locating a person. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 909 Jon Bonnette plays fetch and tug-of-war with Isidore, his air-scent trained search and rescue dog, after a training exercise Tuesday near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1143 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, is all business in the field while trying to find three people who hid on a 40-acre plot Tuesday during a search and rescue training exercise near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 1607 Isidore, an air-scent trained search and rescue dog, returns to her owner after locating a person. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1089 Jon Bonnette plays fetch and tug-of-war with Isidore, his air-scent trained search and rescue dog, after a training exercise Tuesday near Flora Vista. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
Jon Bonnette works with his dogs, training them for search and rescue and human remains detection.
Bennet remembers Boulder victims on Senate floor In tearful address, senator shares personal anecdotes about victims 2746 1529 In a speech at the Senate, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet read the names and ages of the victims killed earlier this week in a shooting in Boulder. He said each of the 10 victims represent “the best of Colorado.” false U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet shared personal anecdotes and urged his colleagues to vote for better gun control legislation Wednesday on the Senate floor in the wake of Monday’s deadly shootings in Boulder. “My heart goes out to all the families, and the entire community of Boulder,” Bennet said. “We have endured too many tragedies as a state.” On Monday, less than a week after eight people, mostly of Asian descent, were shot and killed in Atlanta, 10 people were killed in a King Soopers grocery store in Boulder. The suspect has been charged and is in custody. “It’s long past time for Congress to take meaningful action to keep deadly weapons out of the wrong hands,” Bennet said in a news release issued Monday after the shooting. “There are steps that the overwhelming majority of Americans want us to take. And they have every right to expect us to finally do something about gun violence in our country. Enough is enough.” On Wednesday, he called for similar action. “We can’t allow this to become normal,” Bennet said on the Senate floor. Bennet spent 15 minutes talking about the Boulder shooting. In his speech, he shared information about the 10 victims, lamented how younger people, including his 21-year-old daughter, have grown up “in the shadow of gun violence” and urged his fellow senators to pass legislation to prevent future tragedies. “My daughter’s generation will always bear the burden of a national government that did nothing to protect them,” he said. Bennet, D-Colo., shared the names of the victims, their ages, their occupations and some personal anecdotes, quoting their family and friends in his speech as well as some of their own posts on the internet. He said each of the victims represent “the best of Colorado.” “I’m just asking us to show an ounce of their courage, by doing whatever we can to keep weapons of war out of our communities; to pass universal background checks; to limit the size of magazines; to address the epidemic crisis of mental health in this country,” Bennet said. “It seems like that would be the least that we could do.” The senator’s tone and presence was solemn during his speech, and he was visibly choked up at times. He frequently paused to wipe away tears. 0 Video YouTube 1280 720 “They have grown up with a reasonable fear that they will be shot in their classrooms, or in their schools, or at a movie theater, or in any public place,” Bennet said. “I didn’t grow up in an America with more gun-related deaths than virtually any country in this world. And we can’t accept it for their America.” He brought up the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado, the 2017 shooting in Las Vegas and the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. He said the vote taken in the Senate after the Sandy Hook shooting was “one of the darkest moments” of his career, because “the Senate couldn’t even pass universal background checks.” “Who are we to insist that they live terrified in their own country? Nobody insisted that we live that way,” Bennet said. “But our failure to act has helped create these conditions. And we can’t wait any longer. The Senate needs to act. There’s nobody else to act but the United States Senate.” Earlier in this month, the U.S. House passed two bills that would increase background checks on people looking to purchase firearms in a partisan vote. Republicans, including U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., opposed the legislation. Boebert condemned the violence on Monday, but maintained her stance against gun control and said Democrats should “stop focusing on gun control and start focusing on border control,” in a tweet Thursday. The two gun-control bills have been received in the Senate, but have yet to be scheduled to be debated or voted on. Grace George is an intern for The Durango Herald and The Journal in Cortez and a student at American University in Washington, D.C.
In tearful address, senator shares personal anecdotes about victims
KSUT Public Radio's new building KSUT Public Radio employees have moved into their new building in Ignacio. 1600 1067 Tami Graham, KSUT executive director, shows one of several production rooms Wednesday at the station’s new location in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1050 Tami Graham, KSUT executive director, is on the air in the radio station’s broadcast room Wednesday at its new location in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1080 Sheila Nanaeto, tribal radio station manager, in the tribal broadcast room at KSUT Public Radio’s new facility Wednesday in Ignacio. Nanaeto said: “One thing nice about the new broadcast room is when you interview someone you can be face-to-face, unlike at our old location my back was turned to them.” Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1031 Tami Graham, KSUT executive director, is on the air in the radio station’s broadcast room Wednesday at its new location in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 849 Tami Graham, KSUT executive director, works a new state-of-the-art sound board in the radio station’s broadcast room Wednesday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 893 Tami Graham, KSUT executive director, works a new state-of-the-art sound board in the radio station’s broadcast room Wednesday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 803 KSUT Public Radio’s new, $2.5 million home Wednesday in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1071 KSUT Public Radio’s new facility Wednesday in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 867 New electronics in the KSUT Public Radio facility Wednesday in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 872 Sheila Nanaeto, tribal radio station manager, in her office at KSUT Public Radio’s new facility in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 KSUT Public Radio’s new facility in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 867 KSUT Public Radio’s new facility in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 The KSUT Public Radio meeting room at the radio station’s new facility in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 Rob Rawls with KSUT Public Radio works in one of the production rooms at the radio station’s new facility Wednesday in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1600 1067 KSUT Public Radio’s live performance room remains under construction at the radio station’s new facility in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 867 Tami Graham, KSUT executive director, shows the view of the Pine River Valley from the back of the station’s new facility in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
KSUT Public Radio employees have moved into their new building in Ignacio.
Ignacio vs. Mancos boys and girls basketball The Ignacio High School boys and girls basketball teams hosted Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. 1300 1346 Rhiley Montoya of Mancos High School and Charlize Valdez of Ignacio High School go for the ball on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1293 Shelcie Gosney of Ignacio High School puts up a shot while playing Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 880 Ignacio High School girls basketball head coach Justa Whitt yells instructions to her team while playing Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 669 Quincy Montoya of Mancos High School and Laci Brunson of Ignacio High School go for the ball on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1265 Madi Hale of Mancos High School grabs a rebound over Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1320 Shelcie Gosney of Ignacio High School puts up a shot while playing Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1218 Teya Yeomans of Mancos High School tries to save a loose ball while playing Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1335 Shelcie Gosney of Ignacio High School plays defense as she traps Teya Yeomans of Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 1300 788 The Mancos High School bench leaps up in celebration after defeating Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1537 Madi Hale of Mancos High School puts up a 3-point shot over Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1383 Brady McCaw of Ignacio High School puts up a shot while playing Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1307 Ignacio High School boys basketball head coach Chris Valdez watches his team play team against Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1318 Evan Schnert of Mancos High School passes the ball off while playing Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1363 Kail Wayman of Mancos High School looks to pass the ball while playing Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 1105 Bryce Finn of Ignacio High School puts up a shot while playing Mancos High School Tuesday on night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1362 Brady McCaw of Ignacio High School goes up in the air as he defends Connor Showalter of Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1271 Dylan Labarthe of Ignacio High School blocks the shot of Chris Medina of Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1519 Dylan Labarthe of Ignacio High School puts up a shot while playing Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 950 1190 Gabe Tucson of Ignacio High School and Chris Medina of Mancos High School battle for a loose ball on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true 600 1005 Connor Showalter of Mancos High School puts up a shot while playing Ignacio High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald true
The Ignacio High School boys and girls basketball teams hosted Mancos High School on Tuesday night in Ignacio.
CDOT triggers avalanches on Colorado 145 by remote control New technology clears snow from slide paths above highway near Telluride 2000 1142 An avalanche, triggered by remote control, hits Colorado Highway 145. false 2000 1139 Snow from a controlled avalanche piled up 6 feet on Colorado Highway 145 last week. false 2000 1333 A CDOT worker measures a debris field after an avalanche was triggered by a remote-control device in the slide path. false 2000 1189 Todd Jones, CDOT maintenance supervisor, coordinates avalanche control work on Colorado Highway 145 north of Rico last week. false 2000 1136 The Colorado Department of Transportation removes snow from a controlled avalanche from Colorado Highway 145 after a slide was triggered in Yellow Springs Gully. false 2000 1318 The Colorado Department of Transportation uses new remote-control technology to trigger avalanche paths above Colorado Highway 145. false 2000 2306 A Wyssen Avalanche Control tower near Rico is used to remotely trigger an avalanche after the highway was closed. false 2000 1951 Lisa Schwantes, communications manager for the Colorado Department of Transportation, shows the many avalanche paths above Colorado Highway 145 that CDOT monitors and controls. false 0 Video YouTube 1280 720 A loud bang reverberates in the Dolores Valley north of Rico, and a white plume erupts from a steep gully high above Colorado Highway 145. In seconds, a wave of snow hits the closed highway, then settles into a pile more than 6 feet deep. A front-end loader appears and clears a highway lane in 15 minutes, and the road is open again after being closed for about 35 minutes. It was just a morning’s work. The avalanche mitigation was conducted Wednesday by the Colorado Department of Transportation using a new remote control system installed in the fall. The Journal was invited to observe the new technology in use to control an avalanche-prone area. Five, 30-foot-tall towers that lower explosive charges on a tether were installed in “frequent offender” slide paths that lurk above the state highway between Rico and Lizard Head Pass. The systems were provided and installed by Wyssen Avalanche Control of Switzerland. They are safer and more efficient way to mitigate avalanche danger for travelers, said CDOT maintenance supervisor Todd Jones. “This system is a more versatile tool for controlling these slide paths that run pretty often,” he said. During an active winter, the Yellow Springs, Yellow Wall and Peterson slide paths where towers were placed can produce natural avalanches many times a week, or even per day. They might or might not hit the highway. “Our main goal is to bring down smaller avalanches frequently to avoid a large natural one,” Jones said. The remote control system reduces traffic delays, he said, and can be used at night or in low visibility during storms. The explosives do not have to be handled, and the control work can be done with fewer staff in harm’s way. Project cost $1.4 million The more common CDOT avalanche control methods utilize the Avalauncher nitrogen cannon, or a howitzer that shoots an explosive charge into the path from the roadway. Sometimes helicopters are used to drop a charge. They all require good daytime visibility, and crews tend to be closer to the hazardous slide path. CDOT uses the Avalauncher on Colorado 145 and from helicopters on other slide paths around Lizard Head Pass The highway towers were activated last month. The project cost $1.4 million and was deployed to mitigate the troublesome Yellow Springs, Yellow Wall and Peterson slide paths. Four of the five towers released charges and triggered slides. One slide reached the highway from the Yellow Springs gully, and one failed to drop and did not detonate. The tower was being reviewed by Wyssen and CDOT technicians, who monitored the mission with a live data feed. CDOT partners with the Colorado Avalanche Information Center to analyze and conduct avalanche control work on roadways. 2000 1500 Becca Hodgetts, a forecaster for the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, monitors avalanche control work in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Transportation. false Becca Hodgetts, CAIC forecaster for the mountains of southern Colorado, was on scene to analyze avalanche conditions along the highway and review the slides. She said a dry start to the winter led to weak layers at the base of the snowpack, increasing the potential for avalanches. “It has been a pretty dangerous year, and it’s somewhat anomalous,” Hodgetts said. “On the way up here, I could see signs of fresh avalanches.” Extreme avalanche conditions this winter happen about once every 10 years, she said. CDOT has partnered with CAIC on highway avalanche control work since 1991, said CDOT spokesperson Lisa Schwantes, and there has not been a CDOT highway avalanche death in that time. A CDOT worker was killed by an avalanche on Red Mountain Pass in 1990. Before the towers dropped the explosives into the slide path, the highway was closed in both directions, and a sweep ensured the area was clear of vehicles and recreationists. CDOT crew and media wore avalanche beacons and observed the avalanche from a distance. During the work early Wednesday morning, temperatures were below zero. 2000 1425 A crew from CDOT and the Colorado Avalanche Information Center observes the slide path of an avalanche released by a new remote control system. false Spotters were positioned to watch for secondary avalanches that could be let loose from the concussive blast. Crews blocked traffic in both directions a safe distance away. When the highway was closed and crews were in position, Jones sent a coded command from his cell phone that told the tower to lower and release a charge above the slide path. The tower’s deployment box then reset, ready to deploy another charge. The CDOT crew and CAIC were impressed by the results. “The system is efficient and improves safety for CDOT crews and the public,” said Schwantes. “It’s good. We’ll take it. You can see it released the recent fresh snowfall,” Hodgetts said, and it reduced the risk for a natural slide onto the highway. The new technology is favored by CDOT because of its efficiency and reliability. Traditional howitzers likely will be phased out of avalanche control because of their age, Schwantes said. CDOT operates more than 30 remote control avalanche systems at several locations on high mountain highways and the Interstate Highway 70 corridor. In Southwest Colorado, they are used on Colorado 145 near Lizard Head Pass, on U.S. 160 at Wolf Creek Pass and on U.S. 50 at Monarch Pass. Every winter, CDOT and CAIC monitor and control about 278 of 522 avalanche paths above state highways. ]]> jmimiaga@the-journal.com
New technology clears snow from slide paths above highway near Telluride
Hundreds pay tribute to detective who died in San Juan County, N.M. Authorities release few details about deputy’s death 1600 1163 Hundreds of law enforcement vehicles make their way through Aztec on Thursday in a funeral procession for San Juan County Sheriff’s Office Detective Katie Becenti, who died while on duty Feb. 18, but her death was not duty-related. false 3165 2374 San Juan County Sheriff’s Office deputies convene after the procession honoring Detective Katie Becenti, who died last week. false 3316 2487 Deputies line up to salute the procession held Thursday in Farmington to honor Detective Katie Becenti, who died last week. false 1600 1018 Hundreds of law enforcement vehicles make their way through Aztec on Thursday in a funeral procession to honor San Juan County Sheriff’s Office Detective Katie Becenti, who died while on duty Feb. 18, but her death was not duty-related. false 600 1042 Hundreds of law enforcement vehicles make their way through Aztec on Thursday in a funeral procession to honor San Juan County Sheriff’s Office Detective Katie Becenti, who died while on duty Feb. 18, but her death was not duty-related. false 0 Video YouTube 1280 720 FARMINGTON – Community members paid tribute Thursday to a San Juan County Sheriff’s Office detective who died last week while on duty. Hundreds of cars filled a parking lot at McGee Park, the starting point of a memorial procession that included friends, family, law enforcement and other service workers. The procession went through Aztec and north into Colorado. Law enforcement has released few details about the detective’s death, other than to confirm a deputy died while on duty and that the death was not duty-related. The Sheriff’s Office called it an “isolated incident” and said it does not release information about such incidents. 808 1128 Becenti false The Farmington Police Department investigated the case. An open records request submitted last week by The Durango Herald revealed officers responded about 2 p.m. Feb. 18 to an “unattended death” at the San Juan County Sheriff’s Office in Aztec. Officers arrived to find Katie Becenti, 36, deceased. It did not identify the cause of death. Becenti was a mother of three, wife and detective for the San Juan County Sheriff’s Office. In her obituary, she was called “an absolute rock star in everything she did.” At the procession Thursday, law enforcement vehicles, firetrucks, state department vehicles and community members’ vehicles were all staged to participate. The procession drove under a large American flag being held up by two firetrucks. On the route leaving the park, Sheriff’s Office deputies lined up to salute those in the procession. Other members of the community showed up in their vehicles and lined the route as well. 3222 2416 A San Juan County Sheriff’s Office truck brings up the end of a procession held Thursday in Farmington in honor of Detective Katie Becenti, who died while on duty Feb. 18. Her death was not duty-related. false Among the many vehicles that showed up was a school bus. Billy Huish, Becenti’s former school bus driver, said Becenti’s mother was a bus driver for many years before retiring. Huish said he watched Becenti grow up. And even as Becenti grew to over 6 feet tall, he said he always called her “Shorty.” “Anybody who knew Katie will definitely miss her,” he said. “She was that kind of person.” Huish said her smile was genuine and could light up a room. He referred to a photo that accompanied her obituary and said, “That picture with that big ol’ grin on her face, that was just her.” “She will be missed dearly,” he said. “I just loved her to death.” According to her obituary, Becenti is survived by family including her husband, Shaun, and children Abby, Tate and Olivia. mmitchell@durangoherald.com
Authorities release few details about deputy’s death
San Juan Regional Medical Center makes medical records more accessible Hospital will allow patient portal access through iPhone Health app 3456 2304 San Juan Regional Medical Center announced Friday it has partnered with Apple to provide patients access to health records via the iPhone’s Health app. false FARMINGTON – San Juan Regional Medical Center now offers patients access to their individual health records through the iPhone Health app, allowing them to see their health data at any time. On an iPhone, the Health app, which displays a heart as the icon, shows a multitude of health information depending on what users have activated, their apps and which devices they might have. For example, the Health app tracks steps, heart rate and nutrition, among others. The Health Records section is a separate part of the app but allows patients to see all of their medical data and/or progress in one spot. “Health Records creates a direct connection between San Juan Regional Medical Center and a patient’s iPhone, allowing them to see a central view of their allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures and vitals,” said Laura Werbner, spokeswoman for San Juan Regional Medical Center, in a news release Friday. “It also notifies patients when their data is updated.” Dr. Robert Underwood, chief medical officer for San Juan Regional, said the app can cut down on time spent gathering health data. “As a provider, it is not only something I encourage but I use personally as part of my overall wellness efforts,” Underwood said. Annette DiGiacomo, a patient at San Juan Regional, said she visits the medical center for issues that are only “emergency worthy,” though she does have chronic health problems. “Being a chronically ill person, I have grown accustomed to deciphering my own test results, so having easy access would definitely be a perk,” DiGiacomo said. While she doesn’t currently use the Health app much, she said she would use it more if she had the information available to her. But she is concerned about whether the app can be hacked, and if so, if sensitive medical information could be hacked. However, Apple says the Health app was designed to protect patients’ privacy and information by using encrypted connections between iPhone users and health organizations, according to the release. “Health Records protects patients’ privacy through encryption with the user’s iPhone passcode, Touch ID or Face ID, so it is safe and secure to use,” Underwood said. DiGiacomo said having information readily available at her fingertips could be beneficial. “It would have been nice during my stay to have more information at my fingertips regarding my health,” DiGiacomo said. “At that time, they were so busy, I often didn’t feel like I really knew what was going on with my health.” For more information about how to link the Health app to the San Juan Regional Medical Center patient portal, visit https://www.apple.com/healthcare/health-records/. mmitchell@durangoherald.com 0 Video YouTube 1280 720
Hospital will allow patient portal access through iPhone Health app

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