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Fall colors in the San Juan MountainsTrees are not the only colors appearing this fall in the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area. Many plants and grasses add their changing colors to the mix Wednesday on Missionary Ridge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Trees are not the only colors appearing this fall in the Missionary Ridge Fire burn but many plants and grasses add their changing colors on Wednesday on Missionary Ridge. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1425950Engineer Mountain behind fall colors Thursday near Coal Bank and Molas passes. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Gambel oak in the sunshine Wednesday in the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11111600Engineer Mountain behind changing fall colors Wednesday in the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9941600The Missionary Ridge Fire burn area is full of changing aspen trees and Gambel oak Wednesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11791600The Missionary Ridge Fire burn area is full of changing aspen trees and Gambel oak Wednesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10231600Gambel oak in the sunshine Wednesday in the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10571600Aspen trees put on a dramatic show Thursday near Coal Bank and Molas passes. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11901600The Missionary Ridge Fire burn area is full of changing aspen trees and Gambel oak Wednesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9801600A car and colorful aspen trees reflect in a puddle Thursday on Old Lime Creek Road. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10091600The Missionary Ridge Fire burn area is full of changing aspen trees and Gambel oak Wednesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10371600Aspen trees and Gambel oak begin to change colors Thursday near Coal Bank and Molas passes in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. A prolonged drought, aided by plentiful monsoons, are expected to create ideal conditions for fall colors this year in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10571600Thousands of dead trees still stand in the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire burn area north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10231600This year’s aspen trees along Coal Bank and Molas passes make for colorful photos Thursday along U.S. Highway 550 north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10961600Aspen trees and Gambel oak begin to change colors Thursday near Coal Bank and Molas passes in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. A prolonged drought, aided by plentiful monsoons, are expected to create ideal conditions for fall colors this year in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1425950Fall-like temperatures with changing leaves make for good hiking weather Thursday on Old Lime Creek Road. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12131600Aspen trees begin to change colors Thursday around Coal Bank and Molas passes in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10181600This year’s aspen trees along Coal Bank and Molas passes make for colorful photos Thursday along U.S. Highway 550 north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10171600Aspen trees begin to change colors Thursday around Coal Bank and Molas passes in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald7941600Aspen trees and Gambel oak begin to change colors Thursday near Coal Bank and Molas passes in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. A prolonged drought, aided by plentiful monsoons, are expected to create ideal conditions for fall colors this year in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10731600A prolonged drought, aided by plentiful monsoons, are expected to create ideal conditions for fall colors this year in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600A prolonged drought, aided by plentiful monsoons, are expected to create ideal conditions for fall colors this year in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9821600A prolonged drought, aided by plentiful monsoons, are expected to create ideal conditions for fall colors this year in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10391600Thousands of dead trees still stand in the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire burn area north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald37245760
16001503Eli Tomac of Cortez on Saturday won one of two motos at Hangtown in Sacramento, California, to move into second place overall as the 2021 Lucas Oil AMA Motocross series concluded.Eli Tomac’s second-half push propels him to No. 2 finish in motocross seriesCortez rider benefits from strong riding, Roczen crash Eli Tomac of Cortez on Saturday capped a comeback season with a fourth-place finish and a win at Hangtown to overtake Ken Roczen in the motocross standings and finish second overall.Dylan Ferrandis, the rookie sensation in the 450cc class, won the 2021 title.Entering Hangtown Raceway in Sacramento, California, nine points behind Roczen, Tomac set up a strong race day with a fourth-place finish in Moto 1. He started the race in fifth place and passed Christian Craig in Lap 2. Roczen grabbed the early lead over Ferrandis. Cooper Webb was in third.In Lap 6, Tomac raced nearly 2 seconds faster than Webb and passed him for third. Then, with the leaders in his sights, Tomac laid down the fastest lap of the race in Lap 7, at 2 minutes, 14.5 seconds – nearly 2 seconds faster than Ferrandis’ time.His charge was short-lived, however. He crashed in Lap 8, and finished fourth after Webb regained third place. Ferrandis overtook Roczen for the lead and eventual victory in Lap 10. “I felt like I was gonna be able to catch those guys, and of course just missed my one main line,” Tomac said in a post-race interview. “And I washed my front end out.”He also said he injured his thumb in the crash, which hindered his speed after he remounted his bike. 16781133Eli Tomac prepares to race.Part 2 of the race day storyTomac got his break in Moto 2.He avoided a crash at the first turn, which snagged Ferrandis and Roczen. Ferrandis dropped to 23rd place after Lap 1, and Roczen dropped out of the race altogether.Tomac finished Lap 1 in fourth place and passed Max Anstie for third in Lap 3 while Craig and Webb raced for the lead.It was the green light that he’d been waiting for.Webb and Tomac passed Craig in Lap 5 and engaged in a duel for first. Tomac posted his fastest lap in Lap 8, and passed Webb for the lead and eventual victory with seven laps to go.Ferrandis ran perhaps the most striking comeback race of the season. After crashing in the first turn, Ferrandis started Lap 2 in 23rd place. But he charged into sixth place in Lap 5 and into third in the 14th of 15 laps.Ferrandis’ combination of a first and third in the two motos gave him the overall victory, his sixth of the 12-race season. Tomac was second overall, with a fourth and first, and Webb was third, with a third and second.Tomac’s victory in the second moto gave him his sixth moto win of the season and his third since winning the second of two motos in the Ironman in Crawfordsville, Indiana, on Aug. 28.It also capped the end of a surge that gained momentum in the second half of the series.0VideoYouTube480360The second half of the seasonSince racing in Washougal, Washington, on July 24, Tomac was on the moto podium nine out of 12 tries. In the first half, he was on the podium just four times.He started the second half in fourth place overall, two points behind Justin Barcia at 207-205, and 25 points behind runner-up Roczen at 230-205. Ferrandis led with 262 points.This season, Tomac won two of the 12 races and finished on the podium 13 times. His average finish during the first half of the season was 5.5. In the second half, he cut that average to 2.6, for an average of 4.1 for the entire season.Ferrandis, the rookie for Yamaha who made the leap to the 450cc class this year, won eight of the season’s 24 motos, and finished on the podium 22 times. His average finish was 2.1.Roczen won seven motos and was on the podium 15 times. His average finish for the season was 6.1.What’s next?Tomac can’t comment until Oct. 1, when his contract with Monster Energy Kawasaki expires, but insiders say he’ll join the Star Racing Yamaha team. The move would give Star Yamaha Ferrandis and Tomac, the top two finishers in the 2021 AMA Motocross series.On Saturday, Tomac said he had mixed feelings about leaving the Kawasaki “family,” and though he and the team were on good speaking terms, he was “pretty emotional.” “It was tough that way today, leaving the track, but, um you know, it’s this life-goes-on kind of thing, and that's all you can do.” Tomac’s move helped set in motion a series of changes.Jason Anderson of Albuquerque, who had talked with Star Yamaha, likely will take Tomac’s place on Monster Energy Kawasaki. Aaron Plessinger, on the way out at Star Racing Yamaha, likely will go to Red Bull KTM, and Malcolm Stewart has signed with Rockstar Energy Husqvarna.And after that? The Monster Energy Supercross season begins Jan. 8 in Anaheim, California, and Tomac, who first raced in 2010, will be there.“I still have the itch for chasing green flags and checkered flags and being on the start line,” Tomac said Saturday. “I still like to do it, so that's it: I still like to do it. I still enjoy trying to win races and trying to be the best guy. So, um, that's why I'm still around. “
Cortez rider benefits from strong riding, Roczen crash
Local first responders honor fallen in stair climb on 20th anniversary of Sept. 11 attacksThe annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College started and finished at the top of the Sky Steps at FLC on Saturday. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10961600jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters and law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning at Fort Lewis College during the annual stair climbing event in honor of the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11021600jm@durangoherald.comSome take a moment to rest or think about why they are climbing the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event in honor of the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1540950jm@durangoherald.comWater and Gatorade was handed out during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College on the Sky Steps that participants climbed five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1118950jm@durangoherald.comA dousing of water was welcome during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College on the Sky Steps. Above average temperatures added to the difficulty of completing the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1425950jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600jm@durangoherald.comAbove average temperatures during the annual stair climbing event on the Sky Steps at Fort Lewis College added to the difficulty of completing the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)10121600jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9311300jm@durangoherald.comA dousing of water was welcome during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College on the Sky Steps. Above average temperatures added to the difficulty of completing the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1545950jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600jm@durangoherald.comThe annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College started and finished at the top of the Sky Steps at FLC on Saturday. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11141600jm@durangoherald.comGus Elbert, a Durango Fire Protection District firefighter, is cooled down with water after he completed the annual stair climbing event on the Sky Steps at Fort Lewis College. Participants climbed the steps five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1339950jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10711600jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10561600jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9921600jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1320950jm@durangoherald.comFirefighters, law enforcement, family members and friends make their way down and up the Sky Steps on Saturday morning during the annual stair climbing event at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600jm@durangoherald.comChief Bob Brammer with the Durango Police Department and officers participated in the annual stair climbing event Saturday on the Sky Steps at Fort Lewis College. The event honors the 412 emergency workers who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. Each participant climbed the stairs five times to simulate climbing the World Trade Center’s 110 flights of stairs. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11401600
16001050A fly-in will take place at the Cortez Municipal Airport Sept. 25. Last year, the Cortez City Council awarded the operation contract of the airport to the Cortez Flying Service over another company it had considered. First fly-in to take place at Cortez Airport Go on a discovery flight and learn more about the history of the Cortez Airport Sept. 25 Fly alongside Mesa Verde National Park in a chartered sightseeing flight. Residents can do this and more at the Four Corners Fall Fly-in Sept. 25 — the first event of its kind in Cortez. “It's going to be an open house into the local aviation community, which hasn't really been facilitated much in the past,” said Cortez Airport manager Jeremy Patton. “So, my goal is to open people's eyes to their airport locally, and then the general aviation in the country.” He’s organizing the event with the airport and the Cortez Flying Service. Visitors can dive into the history of the airport, as well as what Patton says has come to be known as “The Miracle at Cortez” — a Lockheed U-2 spy plane emergency landing at the airport – with special presentations from the airport and Cortez Flying Service. Gerald Vincent from the Cortez Aviation Heritage Society will help facilitate the presentation. Vincent will dive into the history of local aviation, as well as remarkable events in the airport’s timeline – like the emergency landing and a single-engine aircraft that traveled around the world, taking off and landing at the Cortez Airport, he said. Another local veteran flying enthusiast, Garth Greenlee with the Cortez Flying Service, will share his aviation expertise at the event. In 1953, at 14 years old, he got his first job at the airport fueling airplanes. It wasn’t the airport Cortez now knows — rather, it had a dirt runway to the west of where the planes take off today, he said. That sparked the start of his 49-year flying career, which saw him leave and return to Cortez. He was compelled to write a book about his flying career, and tells the story on Youtube at https://bit.ly/GarthGreenlee.0VideoYouTube480360“I spent a lot of time — I know every pilot that ever was working there in their early years. I know every one of them. They're all gone. But I'm still hanging,” he said. “I just love airplanes.” Patton hopes the event will give the public a glimpse into the different types of aircraft – for instance, privately owned, military, firefighter —–as well as better acquaint them with the daily functions of the airport. The event promises static aircraft displays, a hot air balloon display, activities for children, food trucks, door prizes and appearances from local law enforcement and classic air ambulance service providers. Members of Over the Hill Car Club will feature classic and muscle cars. Motorcycles from Chrome Mafia also will be on show, Patton said. “I came up with the idea so we could get Cortez involved a little bit more and get their airport a little more exposure. And if that gets a kid interested in flying, then that's that's a win,” he said. “If it's one kid, if it's 20 kids, it'd be great. If it's people that never thought they could fly, and they're 50 they can realize ‘Oh my gosh, there's a flight school here in my own town.’”He plans to make the fly-in a yearly occurrence, with the goal of sponsorships that would provide scholarships to students in areas such as pilot training and aircraft mechanics.
Go on a discovery flight and learn more about the history of the Cortez Airport Sept. 25
Fort Lewis College football and men's soccer games on SaturdayMoises Durazo of Fort Lewis College controls the ball on Saturday while playing Texas Permian Basin at FLC. The two teams tied, 2-2. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)1209950Kieran Fry of Fort Lewis College returns a kickoff on Saturday while playing New Mexico Highlands at FLC. Highlands, however, won the game, 44-7. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)1341950Brayden Miller of Fort Lewis College looks for a receiver downfield on Saturday while playing New Mexico Highlands at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)9431300Clayton Rutz of Fort Lewis College drives to make a tackle on Saturday while playing New Mexico Highlands at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)9581300Fort Lewis College head football coach Darrius G. Smith talks with his team while playing New Mexico Highlands on Saturday at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)8991300Quarterback Brayden Miller of Fort Lewis College looks to hand off the ball on Saturday while playing New Mexico Highlands at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)1101950Brayden Miller of Fort Lewis College hands off to Jeff Hansen on Saturday while playing New Mexico Highlands at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)11941269Aymaro Vargas of Fort Lewis College pushes the ball on Saturday while playing Texas Permian Basin at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)10071300Quinn Bosanko of Fort Lewis College fights off a defender on Saturday while playing Texas Permian Basin at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)1455950Goalie Peter Byrne of Fort Lewis College calls out instructions to his teammates on Saturday while playing Texas Permian Basin at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)8451300Daniel Coronado Morales of Fort Lewis College strikes the ball on Saturday while playing Texas Permian Basin at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)9741300Tomas Duenes of Fort Lewis College celebrates his goal on Saturday against Texas Permian Basin at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)1549950The Fort Lewis College men’s soccer team starters lineup on Saturday before the start of the game against Texas Permian Basin at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)9331300Fred Mady III of Fort Lewis College wraps up the ball carrier as Austin Anderson is double teamed on Saturday while playing New Mexico Highlands at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)11811600Max Hyson of Fort Lewis College knocks the ball loose as he hits the New Mexico Highlands quarterback on Saturday while playing at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)642950Fort Lewis College head football coach Darrius G. Smith talks with his team while playing New Mexico Highlands on Saturday at FLC. (Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)1111950
Montezuma-Cortez beats Cedaredge at homeNo. 4 Ace Dennison and No. 20 Dorian Hilliard block for Tay Wheat on a sweep around the end Friday night. The Montezuma-Cortez beat Cedaredge 22-13.12142000Ryder Higgins tackles Lane Hunsberger as the Cedaredge running back fumbles the ball.18811692Ryder Higgins takes a Cedaredge kickoff down field to the Bruins 31 yard line Friday night. The Panthers won the game 22-13.11532000Tay Wheat heads for the end zone and six points after receiving a pass from Ace Dennison. The play went for 65 yards in the first quarter. The Panthers went on to win 22-13.20001288Ace Dennison lets go of a pass for the Panthers Friday night against Cedaredge.14302000
Ice Fire near Silverton likely caused by humans, Forest Service saysFire started at boulder 75 feet from Ice Lakes Trail13721035The 2020 Ice Fire started at a boulder about 75 feet from the Ice Lakes Trail. The fire was likely human-caused. (Courtesy of U.S. Forest Service)The Ice Fire, near the popular Ice Lakes Trail west of Silverton in 2020, was likely caused by humans.The 596-acre fire burned for about a week in October 2020 and led to a helicopter rescue of 28 stranded hikers. It started at a large, flat boulder in a meadow near the treeline about 75 feet from the Ice Lakes Trail, according to a U.S. Forest Service investigation released in early August.The boulder was a popular rest stop along the trail, the report said.“The only probable factor as to contributing to the start of the fire is human in nature,” the Forest Service report said. “No evidence or conclusive evidence was found in the point of origin. Therefore, the cause of the Ice Lakes Fire is inconclusive.”Investigators ruled out campfires, fireworks, burning debris and natural causes, such as lightning. Because no road or railroad was nearby, mechanical causes also were excluded.“Though no cigarette butt(s) could be found at the specific origin, this is the leading theory,” the report said.Children were listed as a possible cause because of the boulder’s proximity to the trail.The Ice Lakes Trail is one of the most popular and heavily used trails in Southwest Colorado. It starts at an elevation of 9,840 feet and climbs about 2,500 feet to two turquoise alpine lakes, Ice Lake and Island Lake.0VideoYouTube480360The Ice Fire was spotted Oct. 19 about half a mile up the trail. Soon after, Silverton-San Juan County Fire and Rescue crews responded to the area, about 5 miles west of town.The fire spread across the trail and headed uphill, trapping hikers near the burning area until they were rescued by helicopter.By Oct. 26, the fire was 100% contained, and a winter storm knocked it out for good.The trail, however, was heavily damaged by the blaze and closed for the summer. Weakened trees, erosion and flash floods posed safety hazards that made it too risky to open the trail, according to the Forest Service.The trail will reopen Sept. 15. Forest Service managers could extend the closure order if area hazards pose a risk to safety. The trail will reopen only when the area is deemed safe for public entryThe closure order for the trail expires Sept 15. Forest Service managers could extend the closure order if area hazards exist that pose a risk to safety. The trail will reopen only when the area is deemed safe for public entry, said Rebecca Robbins, Forest Service spokesperson.1024812A screenshot of the Ice Lakes closure map as of May. The area was closed because of safety hazards caused by the Ice Fire in 2020. (Courtesy of the U.S. Forest Service)smullane@durangoherald.comEditor’s note: This story was updated to clarify the Ice Lakes Trail closure expires Sept. 15. The trail will reopen only when deemed safe for the public.
Fire started at boulder 75 feet from Ice Lakes Trail
First day at new Ute Mountain Ute charter schoolUte Mountain Ute tribal elder Alfred Wall, center, speaks to the children at Kwiyagat Community Academy, before his blessing Monday during the first day of school in Towaoc for the academy with tribal council members Lyndreth Wall, left, Archie House Jr., near right, and Head of School Danny Porter. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10631600Michael Beard, 5, shows his excitement on the first day of school at the Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10261563Students lineup for recess Monday during the first day of school at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10401600Students at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc play hide and seek at recess on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1177950Students at Kwiyagat Community Academy go back into their classroom after recess on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11211600Archie House Jr., Ute Mountain Ute council member, speaks to the children at Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday during the first day of school in Towaoc for the academy. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10301300Redsky Lang, 5, holds her drawing that she did on her first day of school at the Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12491600Kobrah Root, 7, spins in the air on Monday during recess at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10511600Students at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc take off running at the start of recess on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10291600Students at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc play hide-and-seek at recess on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12151600Teacher, Eddie Loughran, sounds the train whistle to get students to lineup for recess on Monday during the first day of school at Kwiyagat Community Academy in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10661600Teacher, Jennifer Flaherty at Kwiyagat Community Academy, gets students to lineup to go back inside after recess on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10481600Teacher, Jennifer Flaherty at Kwiyagat Community Academy, talks with students about the importance of washing hands before lunch on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12471600Danny Porter, head of school at Kwiyagat Community Academy, pours water for students after recess on Monday during the first day of school. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1255950Lyndreth Wall, Ute Mountain Ute council member and education liaison, speaks to the children at Kwiyagat Community Academy on Monday during the academy’s first day of school in Towaoc. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9741300
Mancos cross-country team posts solid finish in annual Bear Chase Mancos High School was the top finisher Friday among Montezuma County schools in the third annual Boggy Draw bear Chase, hosted by Dolores High School.In score-5 formatting – the first five members of a team to cross the finish line – Mancos totaled an adjusted 79 points and finished in fourth place behind Durango (72), Monticello, Utah (52), and Blanding, Utah, San Juan (42).Using a score-4 format, San Juan would have won with a meet-low 28 points, ahead of Monticello (33), Durango (46) and Mancos (54).Mancos' Teagan Archer (97) passes Dolores' Maya Lowe during the high-school girls race at the Boggy Draw Bear Chase on Aug. 20. Archer placed a Lady Jay-leading eighth overall, clocking 24:59.70; Lowe finished 10th in 25:35.11.28641909Mancos' Connor Sehnert (305) leads a pack--including Durango's Thomas Pope (293) and others--during the high-school boys' race at Dolores’ Boggy Draw Bear Chase on Aug. 20. Sehnert finished 10th overall in a time of 20 minutes, 36 seconds flat; Pope followed closely in an 11th-place 20:36.55.25401693Joel Priest/Special to The JournalClocking a time of 18 minutes, 19.02 seconds, Mancos' Edgar Hernandez (303) won - -by a comfortable 28.09 seconds over Durango's Nathaniel Ellis -- the high-school boys' feature at Dolores' 3rd Annual Boggy Draw Bear Chase on Aug. 20.24001600Joel Priest/Special to The JournalDolores' Elia Lowe (71) placed a Lady Bear-best ninth overall at the season-opening, DHS-hosted the third annual Boggy Draw Bear Chase Friday, Aug. 20. Her time was 25:20.98, helping the Lady Bears total an adjusted score-5 82 points and place third as a team behind Durango (38) and Monticello, Utah (74). In score-4 formatting, Dolores would have accumulated 55 points and remained in third, behind Monticello (48) and Durango (21).24001600Joel Priest/Special to The JournalWyatt Kiddoo (199) was Dolores' sole boys' representative in the DHS-hosted 3rd Annual Boggy Draw Bear Chase on Aug. 20. He placed 35th overall in 26 minutes, 44.30 seconds.28761917
Mancos High School was the top finisher Friday among Montezuma County schools in the third annual Bo...
1270625 Midge Kirk interviews business owners, artists, authors and locals embarking on adventures.Mancos library sheds light on community with video seriesMidge Kirk remembers how the Mancos Public Library was when she first started: stacks of books everywhere, and a closet that four people called an office. One day, a child about 5-years-old climbed over the counter. “This is the heart,” he said. It’s been striving to stay that way – the center of the community, ever since — she said. The latest in the library’s community endeavors is a YouTube series featuring interviews with locals, which Kirk hosts. “We have a lot of really interesting people here,” Kirk said. The interviews are split into four categories: Business in the Backyard, Life is an Adventure, authors and artists. The latest in the series featured Brent McWhirter, co-owner of the Columbine Bar and Grill. 0VideoYouTube480360The library has always hosted adult programs, but it had to find a way to adapt at the onset of the pandemic, Kirk said. As it has been for many others, Zoom was the solution. “I think one of our goals during this whole insane COVID time has been to keep community connected,” she said. “It’s been stressful for everybody.” Coming up is an interview with an expert in neuromuscular reprogramming. “If you want to know what that is, you'll have to tune in because it's powerful,” she said. The library will also be pursuing an oral storytelling series, a dream since 1999, Kirk said. A resident for 22 years now, she wants people to feel as moved by the stories that come out of Mancos Valley as she is. “I always wanted to come out West,” she said. “I wanted to do it on a Harley. But I didn't have a Harley — I had a Toyota and two dogs. We just took our time, came across the country, and I drove down River Canyon and tears came down my face. It's like I could feel the ancestors. It was just something so powerful about it. And I've never left.” An East Coast author almost took on the project of capturing the area’s stories, but it wasn’t meant to be — for her. Kirk and the library team didn’t want to give up on the idea, though, and library director Lee Hallberg gave them the green light. “Many of us here at the library have said, ‘Wow, that person is such a source of information for this area, let's get that story’ and then we don't, and they pass,” she said. “I can think of four or five that we said that about, and rest their souls, they're gone.” The library is hoping to begin with stories of Mancos women who fashioned a quilt hanging in the library, each square representing an aspect of the town. 25512918A quilt depicting different aspects of Mancos hangs in the Dolores Public Library. kparkinson@the-journal.comShe hopes that one day the stories could even develop into a take-home composition in the form of a book or DVD. “We're going to begin it and exactly how it will unfold — it will take on a life of its own,” she said.
Midge Kirk remembers how the Mancos Public Library was when she first started: stacks of books every...