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FLC partners with Los Alamos National Laboratory to promote Indigenous women in physicsTwo students selected for an internship with nuclear and particle physicists1972967Two students from Fort Lewis College were chosen to be the first participants in an internship program developed by the college and Los Alamos National Labratory to promote Indigenous women in physics. (Courtesy of Fort Lewis College)Los Alamos National Laboratory has partnered with Fort Lewis College to provide an internship program for undergraduate Indigenous women interested in a career in physics.“Indigenous women are the most underrepresented group in physics degree completion and careers, and we’re in a region where the demographics are heavily Native American,” said co-principal investigator Astrid Morreale, physicist with the Nuclear and Particle Physics and Applications group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in a news release.The new program aims to build a pipeline of talent from the undergraduate level in the Four Corners to get them enrolled in graduate programs and eventual careers in physics, including at national laboratories such as Los Alamos.“It’s a bit of an incoherence, where we’re here doing high-level science and engineering, yet still underrepresented groups are either not coming to us or we’re not bringing them in,” Morreale said. “This program represents an effort to turn that around.”0VideoYouTube480360Two FLC students were selected to be the first participants in the program: Julie Nelson, an engineering and math major with an emphasis in physics, and a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Ariello Platero, also an engineering and math major with an emphasis in physics, and a member of the Navajo Nation.“This internship and the research I am privileged to participate in will be the first steps I take in pursuit of a career in physics,” Nelson said. “Obtaining the knowledge no longer seems out of reach because of this opportunity. I am thrilled to get hands-on experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory and explore the research side of academia while collaborating with scientists and mentors about the contributions of nuclear and particle physics that can benefit humanity.”The students will receive year-round mentoring from laboratory physicists while attending FLC. Included in the program is a 10-week internship in Los Alamos and a two-week visit to CERN, the European Council for Nuclear Research.“As a Navajo woman in the STEM field, I am very excited to work with the Los Alamos team, because it gives me an opportunity to contribute to and to help pave the way for new and exciting physics discoveries,” Platero said. “I am looking forward to continuing on this path to graduate school and to representing my tribe and showing the younger generation that we can do great things if we apply for these opportunities and put in the work.”Students in the program will also be able to participate in the American Indian Resource Group that promotes access to Native American resources and a sense of community and inclusion while learning about high-energy nuclear physics at the laboratory.Nelson and Platero will work alongside Morreale and co-principal investigator Cesar Luiz da Silva, staff scientist and fellow Nuclear and Particle Physics and Applications group member.While the program aims to help Indigenous women advance in physics, Morreale stresses that the laboratory and the field of physics have much to gain by bolstering participation from underrepresented groups.“We don’t see this program as the laboratory just helping students,” she said. “We need them. They would help us if they came here. We want to have different ideas and different points of view in our discipline. We’re trying to help our field by bringing in new talent and perspectives.”The program began on Nov. 15, and funding has been secured through the U.S. Department of Energy for the next two years.Nelson and Platero will conduct gluon saturation research, seeking to discover a new state of matter in which gluons are densely packed and give rise to properties not unlike ordinary glass. Gluons are fundamental particles that glue all visible matter together and can be studied with detectors being constructed at Los Alamos and then deployed at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.njohnson@durangoherald.com
Two students selected for an internship with nuclear and particle physicists
Photos: Mancos takes on Haxtun in Colorado’s 8-man championship gameBluejays lose to Haxtun in historic season Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8461300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9971300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal7721300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9701300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal10931300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9171300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal11991300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal7011300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8671300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8101300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal7491300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal16641300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal14871300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal11121300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal10871300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8691300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9741300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal10661300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9501300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal11121300Mancos senior Chase Moore drives for yardage during the CHSAA state 8-Man championship game, played between the Mancos Bluejays and the Haxtun Bulldogs on Friday at the CSU Pueblo ThunderBowl. Photo by Wendy Collison19773181Mancos senior Chase Moore drives for yardage during the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game, played between the Mancos Bluejays and the Haxtun Bulldogs on Friday at the CSU Pueblo ThunderBowl. Photo by Wendy Collison19412421Mancos senior Chase Moore runs for yardage during the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game between the Mancos Bluejays and the Haxtun Bulldogs on Friday at the CSU Pueblo ThunderBowl. Photo by Wendy Collison17472878Mancos senior Chase Moore drives for yardage during the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game, played between the Mancos Bluejays and the Haxtun Bulldogs on Friday, November 26, 2021 at the CSU Pueblo ThunderBowl. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Herald13552000Mancos senior Chase Moore drives for yardage during the CHSAA state A-8-Man championship game, played between the Mancos Bluejays and the Haxtun Bulldogs on Friday, November 26, 2021 at the CSU Pueblo ThunderBowl. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal15682000Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8671300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal7661300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal14511300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8651300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal16211300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9421300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal14991300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal14911300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal16171300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal1992130024753157Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal9411300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal7781300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal16211300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8651300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal14511300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal7661300Mancos takes on Haxtun in the CHSAA 8-Man state championship game Friday at CSU Pueblo's ThunderBowl. Haxtun won 40-0. Photo by Wendy Collison/Special to the Journal8671300
Bluejays lose to Haxtun in historic season
Mancos beats Sanford in state semifinalsThe Bluejays will face Haxtun for the state title in eight-man footballThe Mancos defense tackles a Sanford runner for a loss Saturday in the state eight-man semifinal football game in Mancos.15581800Chase Moore intercepts a Sanford pass Saturday afternoon against Sanford.1136960The Mancos sideline erupts to cheer for teammates as the Bluejays score a touchdown in the third quarter.9842000Mancos celebrates one of his two touchdowns Saturday in the state semifinal game. 1280746 Quarterback Ayden Mathews lets go of a pass Saturday in the state semifinal game. Mancos won 26-16 to advance to the state title game.9601230Mancos catches a pass and leaves the defender on the ground as he runs into the end zone. 9601211Kail Wayman catches a pass and heads for the end zone to score the first touchdown for Mancos Saturday. 10341600Lane Greenlee celebrates after intercepting a Sanford pass Saturday in the state semifinal game. 961975The crowd cheers as their Bluejays score a touchdown Saturday afternoon on their way to a 26-16 victory. 7301280Coach Josh Gardner tells his team how proud he is of them after defeating Sanford and earning a place in the state playoff game.6611280The Mancos Bluejays celebrate their 26-16 victory over Sanford in the semifinals game of the state eight-man football tournament Saturday in Mancos.11041600
The Bluejays will face Haxtun for the state title in eight-man football
Polis releases budget proposal focused on crime, homelessness and business recoveryColorado governor unveiled $40 billion plan for 2022-23 fiscal year56163744Colorado Gov. Jared Polis makes a point during a news conference about Colorado offering coronavirus vaccinations to children, Thursday in Denver. (David Zalubowski/Associated Press)Gov. Jared Polis wants to spend hundreds of millions of dollars next fiscal year to ease the financial burden of government fees on businesses, reduce homelessness and combat rising crime.The Democrat, who is heading into the final year of his first term and preparing for reelection in 2022, unveiled the wish list Monday as part of his $40 billion budget proposal for the 2022-23 fiscal year, which begins July 1. The plan incorporates state tax revenue and federal coronavirus relief dollars and calls for an 8.5% increase in discretionary spending by the Legislature, which will determine how much of Polis’ plan to pursue.Polis said the budget “doubles down” on his previous initiatives and is “our response to the call of the moment” as Colorado works to recover from the effects of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.“These are proposals that Coloradans will see and feel in their everyday lives,” Polis said.0VideoYouTube480360The governor’s proposal also calls for major investments in efforts in education and to combat climate change and pollution, including the hiring of 50 new staffers for Colorado’s Air Pollution Control Division and spending $150 million to purchase electric school buses to replace their diesel-guzzling counterparts.1024682An electric school bus is seen reflected from bus doors at an International Zero Emission Bus Conference on Sept. 16 in Denver. Ninety-five percent of Colorado’s school buses are diesel-fueled. (Olivia Sun/The Colorado Sun)One of the largest line items in Polis’ plan is $600 million to address the state’s $1 billion unemployment insurance trust fund deficit. The $1 billion is owed to the federal government, and businesses will have to pay a surcharge to help cover the tab.Half of the $600 million will go toward buying down the debt while the rest will be distributed to lower the employer surcharge.Polis wants $100 million of the $600 million to come from federal coronavirus relief dollars the state received earlier this year. State lawmakers haven’t committed to that spending, though Republicans would like to see as much federal aid money go toward the deficit as possible.Another $50 million would be spent under Polis’ plan to prepay six months of fees businesses will owe to implement Colorado’s new paid family and medical leave program. Voters approved the program in 2020 through the passage of Proposition 118.“It would push (businesses’ payments) out closer to when the benefits kick in,” Polis said.There’s also a $51 million proposal to help businesses hire workers, including through job-training programs and apprenticeship programs. There would also be tens of millions of dollars set aside to increase child care options.The governor wants to spend $113 million on public safety. The dollars would go toward grants to reduce recidivism and boost forensic and investigative resources. Polis also wants to spread initiatives where behavioral health experts respond with police officers, which have been successful in Denver.The spending plan also includes $200 million to reduce homelessness, spread across drug and alcohol treatment investments, intervention strategies and community response efforts.“Homelessness has risen to the level of state priority,” Polis said. “We can no longer just say ‘Denver, you deal with it, it’s your fault. Colorado Springs you deal with it. Aurora you deal with it.’ I think it’s become an issue that affects all of us. ... We can either keep doing the same thing, which is not working, or we can say, ‘You know what, cities can’t do this alone. The state needs to step up.’”Crime and homelessness are two areas that Republicans are already attacking Polis on heading into the 2022 election. The issues haven’t been spending priorities for the governor in prior years.32602132Homeless people clear their belongings from a camp, as city of Denver officials warned that the homeless had to move from their makeshift structures along the sidewalks near the Denver Rescue Mission in downtown Denver. (David Zalubowski/Associated Press file)One new proposed program the governor unveiled Monday would pay local transit agencies to offer free fares on high ozone pollution days. This year was the worst in recent decades when it comes to ozone pollution for the northern Front Range.“It can play a role in changing habits and support long-term increases in ridership,” Polis said of the proposed program.Polis also wants to spend $10 million for an environmental study for the potential buildout of a Front Range passenger train system and direct money to help drive down energy-use in cannabis cultivation.Finally, the governor’s budget proposal calls for setting aside $1.8 billion for future budget obligations, including for schools, transportation and affordable housing, as well as $2 billion as a reserve for future economic downturns.The Colorado Sun is a reader-supported, nonpartisan news organization dedicated to covering Colorado issues. To learn more, go to coloradosun.com.
Colorado governor unveiled $40 billion plan for 2022-23 fiscal year
Southwest Colorado expected to receive moisture from ‘atmospheric river’ moving in from PacificWeather Service says rain needed with dryer-than-normal winter expected16001067The La Plata and San Juan mountains on Saturday are bare on the south slopes, but on Monday through Wednesday, the mountains should become covered in snow as a weather system moves through the area. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)A large amount of moisture from the Pacific Ocean, known as an “atmospheric river,” is headed for Southwest Colorado. “It’s basically this strong plume of moisture that comes off of the Pacific,” said Erin Walter, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Grand Junction. “It’s like this continuous stream, almost like a jet but in the form of moisture.”Over the weekend, the atmospheric river dumped more than 5 inches of rain in the San Francisco area, Walter said. Most of the moisture from the storm system will be dropped in California over the Sierra Nevada’s and the Great Basin, with Southwest Colorado getting the last bit of that precipitation on Tuesday. “We aren’t going to see feet of snow like the Sierra Nevada’s, but we are going to see some precipitation,” Walter said. Southwest Colorado has been experiencing warm conditions, which will be a determining factor in how much precipitation falls in the region, Walter said. “We’re seeing snow amounts higher up Tuesday morning, and then as the system moves through, some colder air will move in behind it,” Walter said. 16001133A plume of moisture known as an atmospheric river is making its way across the states, and will bring rainfall to Southwest Colorado on Tuesday. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald file)Towns along U.S. Highway 160 should expect around a quarter of an inch of rain Tuesday, with some areas potentially seeing higher, localized amounts of rainfall around half an inch. “I would expect at least a quarter of an inch for Durango, Cortez and Pagosa Springs,” Walter said. As for snow, Silverton is expected to get about an inch of powder in the city, with around 5 to 8 inches in higher elevations of the San Juan Mountains. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its winter outlook for temperature, precipitation and drought Thursday. NOAA said this will be the second La Niña year in a row. La Niña seasons are caused by cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures in the Tropical Pacific. 0VideoYouTube480360“The Southwest will certainly remain a region of concern as we anticipate below-normal precipitation where drought conditions continue in most areas,” said Jon Gottschalck, with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.Southwest Colorado is expected to have 40% to 50% higher temperatures than normal, 33% to 40% lower precipitation than normal, and drought conditions expected to worsen. “Any moisture is definitely welcomed,” Walter said. njohnson@durangoherald.com
Weather Service says rain needed with dryer-than-normal winter expected
Snow storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on TuesdayAn ice and snow-packed Coal Bank Pass on U.S. Highway 550 had drivers slowing down Tuesday as a storm moves through the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10451584Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Businesses and residents clear snow Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10501600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10811600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango leaving several inches of snow. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10681300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10521600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cold temps and high winds took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Businesses and residents clear snow Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11201600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow on Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9411600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Horses graze in a snow covered pasture on Tuesday north of Durango as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral A winter storm took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10791600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Clouds lift from the West Needles on Tuesday morning to reveal snow-covered San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10571600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Up to a foot of snow was reported in some places early Tuesday in the San Juan Mountains. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10081600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cold temps and high winds took a toll on fall colors early Tuesday in Southwest Colorado. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10671600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Clouds lift from the West Needles on Tuesday morning to reveal snow-covered San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald9821600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Purgatory Resort received several inches of snow Tuesday morning as a winter storm moves through the area. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10901600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Horses graze in a snow-covered pasture Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Drivers in the lower elevations on U.S. Highway 550 encountered wet roads as a winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10741600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Tourists from the D.C. area photograph snow-covered trees Tuesday in the San Juan Mountains north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Drivers in the lower elevations on U.S. Highway 550 encountered wet roads as a winter storm moves through the San Juan Mountains on Tuesday north of Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10261600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral
18001350The West Fork of the Dolores River valley saw steady snow Tuesday morning. (Jim Mimiaga/The Journal)Photos: Snowstorm arrives in Southwest ColoradoDrivers distracted by slushy roads, epic fall scenery in Dolores River ValleySnow and rained arrived in Dolores and Cortez this week. The storm knocked off the fall colors of mountain aspen, but what remains contrasts nicely with fresh snowfall.The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm watch for Monday and Tuesday as the second of two weather systems arrived in the area.Up to 10 inches of snow is possible at 9,000 feet elevation in the northwest and southwest San Juan Mountains, the weather service said Monday.Residents of Montezuma County continues to face a 90% chance of rain or snow Tuesday, and a 50% chance of show showers tonight before midnight. Wednesday is expected to be mostly sunny, but on Thursday, there’s a 30% chance of rain or snow.A freeze watch remains in effect.Ski areas on Tuesday cranked up their snow reports as the season’s first big storm swept across Colorado.Wolf Creek Ski Area reported 6 inches of new snow, and Telluride Ski Resort reported 1.6 inches.Ranch life in the West Fork valley is always scenic. (Jim Mimiaga/The Journal)13501800Fresh snow and fall colors are a perfect mix along the West Fork of the Dolores River. (Jim Mimiaga/The Journal)15421800Colorado Department of Transportation plows were out early in the Dolores Valley to clear the fresh snow on Colorado Highway 145. (Jim Mimiaga/The Journal)15962475Snowstorms hit the Dolores River Valley Tuesday morning creating slushy conditions on Colorado. Highway 145. (Jim Mimiaga/The Jounral)480720Thanks to monsoons replenishing soil moisture, snow falling in the San Juan Mountains might make it to parched McPhee Reservoir during spring runoff in 2022. (Jim Mimiaga/The Journal)12021800
Drivers distracted by slushy roads, epic fall scenery in Dolores River Valley
Mark Redwine sentenced for the murder of his sonCory Redwine and his mother Elaine Hall wait for the start of a sentencing hearing Friday for Mark Redwine, who was convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11321600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cory Redwine reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for his father, Mark Redwine, who was found guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald893950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall reads a statement and walks past Mark Redwine on Friday during the sentencing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11241300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Brandon Redwine, Dylan's half-brother, reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine at the La Plata County Courthouse. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12411300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13831300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15281300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine chose to remain silent at Friday’s sentencing hearing. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13471300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall said she never thought her ex-husband would take out his frustration on their 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday in 6th Judicial District Court. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald16931300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine wore a suit and tie to court during his five-week jury trial but appeared in jail garbs Friday at his sentencing hearing, where he was given 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10981600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19251300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne speaks with his prosecution team during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11641600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne said Mark Redwine took Dylan’s life and deprived his family and the world from the possibilities of what he could have become. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Family members react after District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announced a 48-year prison sentence for Mark Redwine, the father convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11001300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday. The judge handed down a 48-year-prison sentence for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11741300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands as he answers a question from District Judge Jeffrey Wilson during a sentencing hearing Friday in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1331950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands between his defense team as he listens to District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announce his sentence on Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19171300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands with his defense team Friday as District Judge Jeffrey Wilson hands down a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11831600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine declined to speak Friday during his sentencing hearing after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is lead out of the courthouse Friday after receiving a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15091300
VIDEO: Watch the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine0VideoYouTube4803609501205Mark Redwine was sentenced Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, to 48 years in prison after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death of his 13-year-old son, Dylan.
Mark Redwine was sentenced Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, to 48 years in prison after being found guilty ...
Colorado father sentenced to prison for killing 13-year-old son, Dylan RedwineMark Redwine, 60, was found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death13001347Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine sits in shackles Friday at the La Plata County Courthouse during a sentencing for killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse causing the death. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)Mark Redwine, the Vallecito father who was found guilty this summer of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, was sentenced Friday to 48 years in prison.“I have trouble remembering a convicted criminal defendant that has shown such an utter lack of remorse for his criminal behavior,” said 6th Judicial District Court Judge Jeffery Wilson, in handing down the maximum penalty.Redwine, wearing an orange, jail-issued jumpsuit, declined to speak; his attorneys said he plans to appeal.10041449DylanBut in a pre-sentence investigation, which looks into the legal and social background of convicted criminals and gives them a chance to weigh in, Redwine wrote a few terse words while maintaining his innocence. Judge Wilson read those comments into the record Friday.“Innocent of all charges. Miscarriage of justice. Fake conviction. Sham trial,” Redwine wrote. “... I take this circumstance very seriously and want to make clear that I too have lost a child I love more than life itself. I will fight for true justice, not for myself but for Dylan. I have always shown remorse for the things that I am guilty of. Stand against fake justice.”15421160DylanElaine Hall, Dylan’s mother, said she she is pleased with Friday’s outcome. “It’s justice as far as justice can go,“ she said. “... There will never be enough time for taking Dylan’s life, but at least he hopefully won’t get out. Hopefully he’ll die in prison.”Redwine, 60, was facing 16 to 48 years in prison after a 12-person jury found him guilty July 16 of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.Prosecutors asked the court to sentence Redwine to the full 48 years, citing several aggravating circumstances, including that Redwine killed his own son, misled law enforcement and has shown no remorse.“He stands before you refusing to accept responsibility, showing no remorse, reflecting that same cold-hearted murderer’s heart that killed Dylan Redwine,” said District Attorney Christian Champagne. “Your honor, that’s the ultimate aggravating factor that you should consider. And that alone will justify imposition of the maximum sentence in this case – 48 years for both counts.”13001174Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday at the La Plata County Courthouse in Durango. Wilson sentenced Redwine to 48 years in prison. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)In addressing Redwine, Wilson said the evidence against him is “overwhelming.” “First of all, you killed your son, a 13-year-old boy. At 13, he’s still a little boy,” Wilson said. “As the father, it’s your obligation to protect your son, keep him from harm. Instead of that, you inflicted enough injury on him to kill him in your living room.“After the passion of whatever caused you to act the way you did subsided, you didn’t think about Dylan. You thought about yourself, you sanitized the crime scene, you hid Dylan’s body and you went so far as to remove his head from the rest of his body.”Wilson said Redwine’s efforts to conceal Dylan’s body and lie about what happened caused suffering for Dylan’s family and the entire community. His actions deprived Dylan the opportunity to grow up, fall in love, get married and have children, the judge said.In handing down the maximum penalty, Wilson said Redwine takes “absolutely no responsibly” for what he did to Dylan and needs to be removed from society for “a long period of time.”13001383Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse causing death. (Jerry McBride/Durango Herald)Public defense lawyer John Moran made several legal arguments, some that will likely show up in a future appeal. He also asked that certain statements and findings be stricken from the pre-sentence investigation. “Mr. Redwine loved Dylan with all his heart,” Moran said. “The depth of grief Dylan’s loved ones have experienced may never leave a high-water mark. ... Mr. Redwine is eager for fair and impartial review by a higher court. He is appealing and wishes to make no further record here.”The sentencing hearing caps a nearly nine-year homicide investigation that began in November 2012, when Dylan disappeared while on a court-ordered visit to see his father.Prosecutors surmised that Redwine flew into a fit of rage and murdered his son after the boy confronted him about compromising photos. Defense lawyers said Dylan was alive the morning of Nov. 19, 2012 – the day he went missing. His father ran errands in town, and when he returned he found the boy missing – a bowl of cereal on the table and the television turned to Nickelodeon.They suggested a stranger may have harmed Dylan, or that wildlife attacked him while he was out walking.Text messages sent by Dylan to friends and family indicate the boy didn’t want to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with his father. Their relationship had soured in recent months, especially after Dylan found photos of his father wearing women’s lingerie while eating what appeared to be feces from a diaper, according to testimony presented during the five-week trial.0VideoYouTube480360Dylan’s disappearance set off a massive search in the rugged mountains north of Redwine’s home in Southwest Colorado. In the months that followed, community members and law enforcement organized multiple searches, combing the woods for clues.Law enforcement executed several search warrants on Redwine’s home. Forensic testing found traces of Dylan’s blood in his father’s living room, and a cadaver dog detected the recent presence of a corpse in the living room and in the bed of Redwine’s pickup truck.It wasn’t until June 2013 when the first partial remains of Dylan’s body were found about 8 miles up Middle Mountain Road, only a few miles northeast of Redwine’s home, as the crow flies.In November 2015, a pair of hikers found Dylan’s skull about 1½ miles farther up the road. Forensic experts testified the skull had what appeared to be knife markings, and wildlife experts said no animal inhabiting this area would have transported a skull that far from the other remains.36172036Mark Redwine and Elaine Hall appeared on “The Dr. Phil Show” Feb. 26 and 27 in 2013. Redwine, Hall and Dylan’s older brother, Cory Redwine, appeared on the show again May 20, 2015. Hall appeared a third time on “Dr. Phil” to provide an update on the case March 22, 2016. (Durango Herald file)As the case wore on, it gained national and international attention, including segments on “Nancy Grace,” and “Investigation Discovery.” Elaine, Cory and Mark appeared on a two-part episode of the “Dr. Phil” show, which ended with Redwine refusing to take a lie detector test. (At least five television news channels were in town for Friday’s sentencing hearing.)Law enforcement received numerous “tips” from psychics who claimed to know where Dylan’s remains could be found, and as a matter of due diligence, law enforcement had to follow up on many of them.The case was largely based on circumstantial evidence. As such, prosecutors decided to convene a grand jury to decide whether there was enough evidence to issue an indictment.The La Plata County grand jury issued its indictment in July 2017, and Redwine, a truck driver, was arrested two days later in Bellingham, Washington.0VideoYouTube480360The judicial process was fraught with delays, especially as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused at least three significant delays. Prior to that, one of Redwine’s attorney’s faced his own legal challenges and was taken off the case, which caused delays. No charges were ever filed against the attorney, and he rejoined the case But after a five-week trial, which included dozens of witnesses, hundreds of pieces of evidence and volumes of discovery, jurors found Redwine guilty on both counts outlined in the indictment.shane@durangoherald.comCory Redwine and his mother Elaine Hall wait for the start of a sentencing hearing Friday for Mark Redwine, who was convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11321600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Cory Redwine reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for his father, Mark Redwine, who was found guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald893950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall reads a statement and walks past Mark Redwine on Friday during the sentencing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11241300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Brandon Redwine, Dylan's half-brother, reads a statement Friday during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine at the La Plata County Courthouse. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald12411300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison for killing his son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13831300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is led out of the courtroom in shackles Friday after being sentenced to 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15281300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine chose to remain silent at Friday’s sentencing hearing. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald13471300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Elaine Hall said she never thought her ex-husband would take out his frustration on their 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday in 6th Judicial District Court. A jury found Redwine guilty in July of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in the death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald16931300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine wore a suit and tie to court during his five-week jury trial but appeared in jail garbs Friday at his sentencing hearing, where he was given 48 years in prison. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10981600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine enters the courtroom Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19251300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne speaks with his prosecution team during the sentencing hearing for Mark Redwine. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11641600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral District Attorney Christian Champagne said Mark Redwine took Dylan’s life and deprived his family and the world from the possibilities of what he could have become. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10531600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Family members react after District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announced a 48-year prison sentence for Mark Redwine, the father convicted of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11001300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Jeffrey R. Wilson, chief judge of the 6th Judicial District, addresses Mark Redwine on Friday. The judge handed down a 48-year-prison sentence for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11741300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands as he answers a question from District Judge Jeffrey Wilson during a sentencing hearing Friday in Durango. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald1331950Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands between his defense team as he listens to District Judge Jeffrey Wilson announce his sentence on Friday. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald19171300Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine stands with his defense team Friday as District Judge Jeffrey Wilson hands down a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald11831600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine declined to speak Friday during his sentencing hearing after being found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald10441600Mandatory Credit: Jerry McBride Durango Heral Mark Redwine is lead out of the courthouse Friday after receiving a 48-year prison sentence. Photo by Jerry McBride/Durango Herald15091300
Mark Redwine, 60, was found guilty of second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death