Center of Southwest Studies receives $25,000 grant

Keywords: FLC, Library and museum,
Liz Quinn MacMillan, left, and Cassidy Ransom, curatorial staffers at the Center of Southwest Studies, work on the Treasures of the Southwest permanent exhibit. Opening Wednesday, the exhibit was made possible in part by a $25,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. Enlargephoto

Courtesy of the Center of Southwest Studies

Liz Quinn MacMillan, left, and Cassidy Ransom, curatorial staffers at the Center of Southwest Studies, work on the Treasures of the Southwest permanent exhibit. Opening Wednesday, the exhibit was made possible in part by a $25,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

With the help of a $25,000 grant, the Center of Southwest Studies will open its new permanent Treasures of the Southwest exhibit Wednesday.

The grant was awarded by the Henry Luce Foundation, which was founded by the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time Inc. The funds were given as part of the foundation’s American Art Program to assist the center in developing the exhibit.

Part of the funding went toward paying curatorial staffer Cassidy Ransom. Ransom, who has worked for the center for four years, graduated from FLC in December, but the grant allowed her to continue working on the exhibit, said Julie Tapley-Booth, business and public relations manager for the Center of Southwest Studies.

The centerpiece of the exhibit will be items from The Durango Collection, a comprehensive group of textiles covering 1,000 years of weaving in the Southwest. Items selected for the opening include some of the collection’s signature pieces produced by Navajo, Puebloan and Hispanic weavers from the mid-1800s to the beginning of the 20th century.

“We are very excited about showcasing The Durango Collection on a rotating basis,” center Director Shelby Tisdale said, “and to have the opportunity to bring more of our treasures out of the vaults to share them with the public.”

Originally assembled by Mark Winter, owner of the Toadlena Trading Post in New Mexico, and the late H. Jackson Clark, founder of Toh-Atin Gallery, part of The Durango Collection was acquired by Richard and Mary Lyn Ballantine.

abutler@durangoherald.com

Center of Southwest Studies curatorial staffers Cassidy Ransom, left, and Liz Quinn MacMillan put some final touches on the Treasures of the Southwest exhibit, which will open Wednesday. Textiles from the Durango Collection are the main feature. Enlargephoto

Courtesy of Center of Southwest Studies

Center of Southwest Studies curatorial staffers Cassidy Ransom, left, and Liz Quinn MacMillan put some final touches on the Treasures of the Southwest exhibit, which will open Wednesday. Textiles from the Durango Collection are the main feature.

Exhibit handler Jack Townes with the Center of Southwest Studies hangs a painting in the Treasures of the Southwest permanent exhibit at the Center of Southwest Studies. Opening Wednesday, the exhibit was made possible in part by a 5,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. Enlargephoto

Courtesy of the Center of Southwest Studies

Exhibit handler Jack Townes with the Center of Southwest Studies hangs a painting in the Treasures of the Southwest permanent exhibit at the Center of Southwest Studies. Opening Wednesday, the exhibit was made possible in part by a 5,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Center of Southwest Studies curator Jeanne Brako works on the Treasures of the Southwest permanent exhibit. Opening Wednesday, the exhibit was made possible in part by a 5,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. Enlargephoto

Courtesy of the Center of Southwest Studies

Center of Southwest Studies curator Jeanne Brako works on the Treasures of the Southwest permanent exhibit. Opening Wednesday, the exhibit was made possible in part by a 5,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.